Fwd: Update: The Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood FOA FAQs have been Updated


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: HMRF Events Team <HMRF@circlesolutions.com>
Date: Tue, Jun 30, 2015 at 6:00 PM
Subject: Update: The Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood FOA FAQs have been Updated
To: Bill Coffin <billcoffin68@gmail.com>


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The Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood FOA FAQs have been updated.  Updated FAQs are now available for viewing and download.                      

Please click here to access the updated Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education FAQs.

Please click here to access the updated New Pathways for Fathers and Families FAQs.

Please click here to access the updated Responsible Fatherhood Opportunities for Reentry and Mobility FAQs.

For more information, please visit the HMRF website. Thank you for your interest.

The HMRF Events Team               


 

 

Fwd: New Individually-Authored Perspectives


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From: Institute of Medicine (IOM) <iomnews-list@nas.edu>
Date: Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 10:22 AM
Subject: New Individually-Authored Perspectives
To: William <billcoffin68@gmail.com>


The Institute of Medicine
View this email in your browser

New Individually-Authored Perspectives

Unleashing the Power of Prevention


Authors: J. David Hawkins, Jeffrey M. Jenson, Richard Catalano, Mark W. Fraser, Gilbert J. Botvin, Valerie Shapiro, C. Hendricks Brown, William Beardslee, David Brent, Laurel K. Leslie, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Pat Shea, Andy Shih, Elizabeth Anthony, Kevin P. Haggerty, Kimberly Bender, Deborah Gorman-Smith, Erin Casey, and Susan Stone

Every day across America, behavioral health problems in childhood and adolescence, from anxiety to violence, take a heavy toll on millions of lives. For decades the approach to these problems has been to treat them only after they’ve been identified—at a high and ongoing cost to young people, families, entire communities, and our nation. Now we have a 30-year body of research and more than 50 programs showing that behavioral health problems can be prevented. This critical mass of prevention science is converging with growing interest in prevention across health care, education, child psychiatry, child welfare, and juvenile justice. Together, we stand at the threshold of a new age of prevention. The challenge now is to mobilize across disciplines and communities to unleash the power of prevention on a nationwide scale. We propose a grand challenge that will advance the policies, programs, funding, and workforce preparation needed to promote behavioral health and prevent behavioral health problems among all young people—including those at greatest disadvantage or risk, from birth through age 24. Within a decade, we can reduce the incidence and prevalence of behavioral health problems in this population by 20 percent from current levels through widespread policies and programs that will serve millions and save billions. Prevention is the best investment we can make, and the time to make it is now.
 
Read the Discussion Paper

A Challenge to Unleash the Power of Prevention


Authors: J. David Hawkins, Jeffrey M. Jenson, Richard Catalano, Mark W. Fraser, Gilbert J. Botvin, Valerie Shapiro, C. Hendricks Brown, William Beardslee, David Brent, Laurel K. Leslie, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Pat Shea, Andy Shih, Elizabeth Anthony, Kevin P. Haggerty, Kimberly Bender, Deborah Gorman-Smith, Erin Casey, and Susan Stone

Prevention is the best investment we can make in behavioral health—and the time to make it is now. Every day, across America, behavioral health problems in childhood and adoles-cence take a heavy toll on millions of lives. These problems cause deep, often long-term damage to young people, families, schools, and communities. They erode the social con-tract that one generation makes with another to equip its young people for a bright future.Behavioral health problems range widely from anxiety and depression to alcohol, tobacco, and drug abuse; delinquent and violent behavior; dropping out of school; and risky sexual activity and unwanted pregnancies. Behavioral health is defined so broadly because many of these problems share risk factors and solutions. Preventing one problem often reduces another, or several others. For decades, the approach to behavioral health problems was to treat them one at a time and only after they were identified—at a high and ongoing price. The cost of treat-ment services and lost productivity attribut-ed to depression, conduct disorder, and sub-stance abuse alone are estimated at $247 bil-lion per year. Other losses—in lifetimes of compromised potential, the fraying of our social fabric, and the diminishment of our nation’s future—are incalculable. 
Read the Commentary
The Institute of Medicine hosts Perspectives to provide leading experts with the opportunity to offer their observations and opinions on innovations and challenges in health and health care. These individually-authored perspectives are not reports of the IOM or the National Research Council and therefore are not subject to their review processes.
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Fwd: Day 180 - Are all people called to marriage? // How is a Church wedding celebrated?


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Catechism in a Year <mail@flocknote.com>
Date: Mon, Jun 29, 2015 at 7:54 AM
Subject: Day 180 - Are all people called to marriage? // How is a Church wedding celebrated?
To: Bill Coffin <billcoffin68@gmail.com>


Why is marriage indissoluble? Not everyone is called to marriage. Even people who live alone can have fulfillment in life. To many of them Jesus shows a special way; he invites them to remain unmarried "for the sake of the...
 
     
Catechism in a Year   Catechism in a Year
   
 
 
 
 


Why is marriage indissoluble?

Not everyone is called to marriage. Even people who live alone can have fulfillment in life. To many of them Jesus shows a special way; he invites them to remain unmarried "for the sake of the kingdom of heaven" (Mt 19:12). Many people who live alone suffer from loneliness, which they perceive only as a lack and a disadvantage. Yet a person who does not have to care for a spouse or a family also enjoys freedom and independence and has time to do meaningful and important things that a married person would never get to. Maybe it is God's will that he should care for people for whom no one else cares. Not uncommonly God even calls such a person to be especially close to him. This is the case when one senses a desire to renounce marriage "for the sake of the kingdom of heaven". Of course a Christian vocation can never mean despising marriage or sexuality. Voluntary celibacy can be practiced only in love and out of love, as a powerful sign that God is more important than anything else. The unmarried person renounces a sexual relationship but not love; full of longing he goes out to meet Christ the bridegroom who is coming (Mt 25:6).


How is a Church wedding celebrated?

As a rule a wedding must take place publicly. The bride and bridegroom are questioned as to their intention to marry. The priest or the deacon blesses their rings. The bride and bridegroom exchange rings and mutually promise "to be true in good times and in bad, in sickness and in health" and vow to each other: "I will love you and honor you all the days of my life." The celebrant ratifies the wedding and administers the blessing. Here are some excerpts from one form of the Rite of Catholic Marriage: Celebrant: N. and N., have you come here freely and without reservation to give yourselves to each other in marriage?" Bride and bridegroom: "Yes." Celebrant: "Will you love and honor each other as man and wife for the rest of your lives?" Bride and bridegroom: "Yes." The celebrant then asks the bride and bridegroom together the following questions. "Will you accept children lovingly from God and bring them up according to the law of Christ and his Church?" Bride and bridegroom: "Yes." (YOUCAT Questions 265-266)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (1621-1624) and other references here.

Check out the incredible series on marriage from the Augustine Institute, Beloved. With both a marriage prep and a marriage enrichment component, it's perfect for both the soon to be married and the married for years!

 
 




Would you like more information about this project, or do you need help? Click here for some FAQs about our Study Programs.
 
 
 
 
 
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Fwd: Day 179 - Why is marriage indissoluble? // What threatens marriages?


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Catechism in a Year <mail@flocknote.com>
Date: Sun, Jun 28, 2015 at 7:53 AM
Subject: Day 179 - Why is marriage indissoluble? // What threatens marriages?
To: Bill Coffin <billcoffin68@gmail.com>


Why is marriage indissoluble? Marriage is triply indissoluble: first, because the essence of love is mutual self-giving without reservation; second, because it is an image of God's unconditional faithfulness to his creation; and...
 
     
Catechism in a Year   Catechism in a Year
   
 
 
 
 

Why is marriage indissoluble?

Marriage is triply indissoluble: first, because the essence of love is mutual self-giving without reservation; second, because it is an image of God's unconditional faithfulness to his creation; and third, because it represents Christ's devotion to his Church, even unto death on the Cross.

At a time when 50 percent of marriages in many places end in divorce, every marriage that lasts is a great sign - ultimately a sign for God. On this earth, where so much is relative, people ought to believe in God, who alone is absolute. That is why everything that is not relative is so important: someone who speaks the truth absolutely or is absolutely loyal. Absolute fidelity in marriage is not so much a human achievement as it is a testimony to the faithfulness of God, who is there even when we betray or forget him in so many ways. To be married in the Church means to rely more on God's help than on one's own resources of love.

What threatens marriages?

What really threatens marriages is sin; what renews them is forgiveness; what makes them strong is prayer and trust in God's presence.

Conflict between men and women, which sometimes reaches the point of mutual hatred in marriages, of all places, is not a sign that the sexes are incompatible; nor is there such a thing as a genetic disposition to infidelity or some special psychological disability for lifelong commitments. Many marriages, however, are endangered by a lack of communication and consideration. Then there are economic and societal problems. The decisive role is played by the reality of sin: envy, love of power, a tendency to quarrel, lust, infidelity, and other destructive forces. That is why forgiveness and reconciliation, in confession as well, is an essential part of every marriage. (YOUCat questions 263-264)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (1612-1617) and other references here.

Want to know more about Marriage? Check out Remaining in the Truth of Christ: Marriage and Communion in the Catholic Church. Explore this book now.

 
 




Would you like more information about this project, or do you need help? Click here for some FAQs about our Study Programs.
 
 
 
 
 
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Fwd: Day 178 - What is necessary for a Christian, sacramental marriage?


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Catechism in a Year <mail@flocknote.com>
Date: Sat, Jun 27, 2015 at 7:28 AM
Subject: Day 178 - What is necessary for a Christian, sacramental marriage?
To: Bill Coffin <billcoffin68@gmail.com>


What is necessary for a Christian, sacramental marriage? A sacramental marriage has three necessary elements: (a) free consent, (b) the affirmation of a life- long, exclusive union, and (c) openness to children. The most profound...
 
     
Catechism in a Year   Catechism in a Year
   
 
 
 
 

What is necessary for a Christian, sacramental marriage?

A sacramental marriage has three necessary elements: (a) free consent, (b) the affirmation of a life- long, exclusive union, and (c) openness to children. The most profound thing about a Christian marriage, however, is the couple's knowledge: "We are a living image of the love between Christ and the Church."

The requirement of unity and indissolubility is directed in the first place against polygamy, which Christianity views as a fundamental offense against charity and human rights; it is also directed against what could be called "successive polygamy", a series of non-binding love affairs that never arrive at one, great, irrevocable commitment. The requirement of marital fidelity entails a willingness to enter a lifelong union, which excludes affairs outside the marriage. The requirement of open- ness to fertility means that the Christian married couple are willing to accept any children that God may send them. Couples who remain childless are called by God to become "fruitful" in some other way. A marriage in which one of these elements is excluded at the mar- riage ceremony is not valid. (YOUCAT question 262)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (1644-1654) and other references here.

What exactly does the Church teach about marriage, divorce and Holy Communion? Get the scoop from five cardinals in Remaining in the Truth of Christ. You'll be glad you've read it once the Synod of the Family arrives this fall!

 
 




Would you like more information about this project, or do you need help? Click here for some FAQs about our Study Programs.
 
 
 
 
 
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